Fr. Tim's Letter - December 16th, 2018

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Hello People of the Resurrection...

On this “Gaudete Sunday” – with the scriptural counsel to “Rejoice” - because we’re closer to fulfillment than we were when Advent began, please let me share about Thomas Merton. 

One of the great spiritual writers of the mid-20th century, Merton died, accidentally electrocuted by a faulty fan, 50 years ago, December 10th, 1968, in Bangkok.

The son of artist-parents, he was a brilliant, inquisitive outrageous ‘playboy’ of a young man, when at 23, and alone in the world, he sought out Baptism as a Roman Catholic.  3 years later, he entered the Trappist Novitiate of Gethsemani Abbey, outside Bardstown, Kentucky. 

And despite the silent, cloistered, simple, austere life there, he would become a world renowned writer, correspondent and spiritual and political commentator.

He yearned for the whole of creation to find its connectedness – it’s unity and community - with God and each other.

Just a few of his insights:

(On Christmas and the Incarnation)

Into this world, this demented inn, in which there is absolutely no room for him at all, Christ has come uninvited.  But because he cannot be at home in it — because he is out of place in it, and yet must be in it — his place is with those others who do not belong, who are rejected because they are regarded as weak; and with those who are discredited, who are denied the status of persons, and are tortured, exterminated. With those for whom there is no room, Christ is present in this world.  He is mysteriously present in those for whom there seems to be nothing but the world at its worst. It is in these that He hides himself, for whom there is no room.”

(On Saintliness) “For me, to be a saint means to be myself. Therefore the problem of sanctity and salvation is in fact the problem of finding out who I am, and discovering my true self.”

There’s so much more; for now, for now, enjoy this sampling!

 

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10th Annual Greater Green Bay Area Interfaith Memorial Prayer Service for Homeless Persons

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sponsored by the St John the Evangelist Homeless Shelter’s Interfaith Ministry Team

Thursday, December 20, 2018

6:40 p.m. Outdoor Silent Walk of Peace

7:00 p.m. Interfaith Prayer Service

Hosted by St. John the Evangelist Catholic Parish     
413 St. John Street

Downtown Green Bay, Wisconsin 54301

Each year since 1990, on or near the first day of winter and the longest night of the year, the National Coalition for the Homeless (NCH) has sponsored National Homeless Persons' Memorial Day to bring attention to the tragedy of homelessness, the lack of affordable housing, and to remember our friends without stable housing who have paid the ultimate price for our nation's failure to address this crisis. This event is open to the public; all are invited to participate in solidarity with those who believe health care, housing, and physical safety are basic human rights, not benefits to be earned.

 

December REVEALED Youth Ministry Nights

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How does God reveal himself in middle school and high school?
What does it mean to be a Catholic teen today? 


All teens and preteens are invited to come to REVEALED nights. Regardless of where you go to school or even your parish, REVEALED is for you.

Each REVEALED night will have time devoted to building relationships, serving others, and growing in our Catholic faith. There will be just-for-fun games, mini-stewardship projects, faith-sharing, and even science experiments to explore some of the elements of our faith. As a community, we will discover how God wants us to live.

REVEALED 7/8 (for 7th & 8th Graders)

Monday, Dec. 10 @ 3:15-5:00pm

REVEALED 5/6 (for 5th & 6th Graders)

Tuesday, Dec. 11 @ 3:15-5:00pm

REVEALED HS (for Freshmen-Seniors)

Wednesday, Dec. 19 @ 5:00-6:15pm

Meet in the POD in the lower level of the parish office.

Advent Wreath Blessing

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BLESSING OF YOUR HOME’S ADVENT WREATH

One of the strongest symbols of Advent is an evergreen wreath holding four candles, three purple/blue, and one pink for the third Sunday of Advent. The use of candles during the darkest and coldest days of the year is an ancient custom adopted in the sixth century by European Christians. The Jewish people have a similar tradition. Even as we light candles, they will be lighting the candles on their menorahs in celebration of Hanukkah.

 

+Begin with the Sign of the Cross together.

Leader: Echo after me. “Come, Lord Jesus!” (all echo)

“Come quickly!” (all echo)

 

Leader: It is wintertime, when days are short and nights are long. We need the light, the warmth, and joy of Christ. Bless this wreath as a sign to us of Jesus our Light. The circle of the wreath is a sign of God’s loving care for us, which has no ending. The evergreen branches are a sign of the faithfulness of God, which is always alive and fresh. The light of these candles will remind us of the coming of Christ at Christmas, who is the Light of the World.

(Light the 1st candle.)

 

Lord God, your son Jesus is Emmanuel, the hope of all peoples. He is the wisdom that teaches and guides us. He is the Savior of every nation. By the light of this Advent wreath we shall wait in patience for your Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. His coming comforts our fears and brings hope to our waiting world and helps us spread the Light of Christ to all we meet.

 

Leader: “Come, Lord Jesus!” (all echo)

“Come quickly!” (all echo)

 

End with the + Sign of the Cross together.